WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Zmodo 2 or 4 Camera CCD Security System

Speed to First Woot:
5m 26.776s
First Sucker:
akeserla
Last Wooter to Woot:
culwell
Last Purchase:
a year ago
Order Pace (rank):
Top 13% of Tech Woots
Bottom 49% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 14% of Tech Woots
Top 31% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

  • 22% first woot
  • 5% second woot
  • 32% < 10 woots
  • 18% < 25 woots
  • 24% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 18% joined today
  • 0% one week old
  • 3% one month old
  • 14% one year old
  • 64% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 94% bought 1
  • 4% bought 2
  • 1% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

4%
5%
2%
0%
0%
1%
4%
5%
9%
8%
7%
6%
4%
4%
4%
8%
1%
4%
3%
6%
2%
3%
5%
3%
12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Woots by State

zero wooters wootinglots of wooters wooting



Quality Posts


kmartind


quality posts: 38 Private Messages kmartind

These are great for letting others spy on your home/business/etc without your permission.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/01/28/more-than-a-dozen-brands-of-security-camera-systems-vulnerable-to-hacker-hijacking/
(actually Zmodo claims their products from 2011 and later shouldn't be as vulnerable to "the same" intrusions as the numerous similar brands, but it still might be wise to keep tabs on the situation as it develops since it doesn't state which year's model these were).

The workaround for vulnerable models, which these might not be, is to turn off uPNP on your router (even though doing so can cause problems with PSN, XBox Live, or Cisco VPN clients, etc) and don't forward any ports to the camera system. That prevents you from accessing your own cameras remotely though.

DonKudler


quality posts: 4 Private Messages DonKudler

Can any of these cameras be used outdoors?

Thanks.

conanthelibrarian


quality posts: 2548 Private Messages conanthelibrarian

everything you wanted to know about the ZMD-DD-SAN4 - Full D1 4CH Standalone DVR from the manufacturer website.

http://www.zmodo.com/4ch-cctv-h-264-standalone-dvr-outdoor-security-surveillance-ir-camera-system-4.html

DonKudler


quality posts: 4 Private Messages DonKudler
DonKudler wrote:Can any of these cameras be used outdoors?

Thanks.



Nevermind....shoulda read the description to find out they're all weatherproof...

ajswoot1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ajswoot1

sorry if i'm dense. i'm tired of re-reading the description. what are my options here? what's the difference between:

Your choice of: four cameras (two bullet & two dome) OR two bullet cameras, and video + power cables and a 12V DC power supply

does the 2 bullet cameras set not come with video+power cables?

i vote this description sucks. i think they probably dont mean that but i don't want to put my money out on that hunch.

kmartind


quality posts: 38 Private Messages kmartind
ajswoot1 wrote:sorry if i'm dense. i'm tired of re-reading the description. what are my options here? what's the difference between:

Your choice of: four cameras (two bullet & two dome) OR two bullet cameras, and video + power cables and a 12V DC power supply

does the 2 bullet cameras set not come with video+power cables?

i vote this description sucks. i think they probably dont mean that but i don't want to put my money out on that hunch.


Slightly confusing, yes, but just look at specs tab for more detail.

In the box:
*(1) ZMD-DD-SAN4 (DVR-H9114V) 4 Channel Security DVR
*Choose: (2) Bullet Cameras & (2) Dome Cameras OR (2) Bullet Cameras
*25ft CCTV Power + Video Cables for Each Security Camera
*(1) 12V/1500mA Single Power Supply for Security Cameras
*(1) IR Remote Control
*(1) Mouse
*(1) User's Manual


It seems fairly clear they meant something more like:
"Your choice of: four cameras (two bullet & two dome) OR two cameras (two bullet cameras). Each camera includes video + power cables. Includes 12V DC power supply."

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 503 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

ajswoot1 wrote:sorry if i'm dense. i'm tired of re-reading the description. what are my options here? what's the difference between:

Your choice of: four cameras (two bullet & two dome) OR two bullet cameras, and video + power cables and a 12V DC power supply

does the 2 bullet cameras set not come with video+power cables?

i vote this description sucks. i think they probably dont mean that but i don't want to put my money out on that hunch.



You can choose between

- 4-Cameras: (2) Bullet Cameras & (2) Dome Cameras ~or~

- 2-Cameras: (2) Bullet Cameras

ajswoot1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ajswoot1
ThunderThighs wrote:You can choose between

- 4-Cameras: (2) Bullet Cameras & (2) Dome Cameras ~or~

- 2-Cameras: (2) Bullet Cameras



danke.

unknownwarrior33


quality posts: 1 Private Messages unknownwarrior33

My girlfriend would be interested in this. Ever since burglars broke into her home a few months ago, she's been very concerned about security.

smwhitaker


quality posts: 0 Private Messages smwhitaker

I'm not terribly tech savvy but thought the purpose of a DVR is to record but this says a separate (not included) hard drive is necessary to record. So what's the purpose of the DVR?

"Supports up to 2TB 3.5" SATA hard drive (hard drive not included). A hard drive is not needed when using cameras for surveillance, but is required when using DVR for recording camera images"

cravit8


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cravit8

I can't find an iOS app for this.

I'm intersted in using an iPad as a monitor/display while at home. $140 seems pretty decent for 4 cams and a dvr.

tweekerz


quality posts: 1 Private Messages tweekerz

L:eft hand frame of products pages:

http://www.zmodo.com/zviewer/

Android and Apple


Also free 3rd party, which also supports Blackberry

http://www.zmodo.com/3g-mobile-iphone-devices-installation/

cravit8 wrote:I can't find an iOS app for this.

I'm intersted in using an iPad as a monitor/display while at home. $140 seems pretty decent for 4 cams and a dvr.



dkahn63


quality posts: 0 Private Messages dkahn63

Hi, all can anybody recommend a wireless camera setup that I can view on the interent to keep track of my elderly mother that lives by her self... thanks all

smwhitaker


quality posts: 0 Private Messages smwhitaker
dkahn63 wrote:Hi, all can anybody recommend a wireless camera setup that I can view on the interent to keep track of my elderly mother that lives by her self... thanks all



Can't personally recommend this but this has pretty good reviews on Amazon and was on sale yesterday for $70 (sorry - sale is over):
Foscam FI8910W Pan & Tilt IP/Network Camera with Two-Way Audio and Night Vision (Black)
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006ZP8UOW/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?t=slicinc-20&tag=dealswoot-20&ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

basscheez


quality posts: 0 Private Messages basscheez

The Features tab says you get 60 ft. cables. The Specs page says you get 25 ft. cables. Which is it?

glenncol


quality posts: 0 Private Messages glenncol

I bought a Zmodo system from Woot a while back and I'm not happy with the DVR's firmware. Menu's were very slow and counter-intuitive.

In a word: tedious.

Even though I have money sunk into this one, I'll buy a different brand in the future.


cycokiller


quality posts: 6 Private Messages cycokiller

I did some [quick] looking and couldn't find any alternate firmware or something similar. But I did find a fellow that has been able to get the video stream(s) from these DVR units into the ZoneMinder software (Linux video camera security and surveillance solution).

I don't have a Zmodo DVR to try this with, but I think I'll pick one of these up and check it out.

Here's a link to the forum post about it: http://www.zoneminder.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=18137&start=0

In relation to the hacking issues, UPNP is for amateurs. It should always be disabled and you should manually configure port forwarding as needed so you know what's coming and going on your router. If you're too lazy to manage your network properly, you deserve to be hacked.

4F682120446F6E277420746F756368206D652074686572652100

cravit8


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cravit8
basscheez wrote:The Features tab says you get 60 ft. cables. The Specs page says you get 25 ft. cables. Which is it?



I 2nd this. 25ft is very different than 60ft.

whomhead


quality posts: 0 Private Messages whomhead
cycokiller wrote:If you're too lazy to manage your network properly, you deserve to be hacked.

This.

_________________________________________
Things I have Wooted:

5150kc


quality posts: 0 Private Messages 5150kc

*Stupid Question*

Will the DVR - once supplied with a HD - re-write itself after a certain period of time?

Example: It records for two days straight and there is no break-in. Will the HD then re-record over the existing content?

bluemaple


quality posts: 64 Private Messages bluemaple

Tread lightly...

1) This DVR (the box that records what your cameras see) is not functional until you install your own hard drive. Not difficult, but you need to buy separately and install. Specs don't say it needs a video-optimized harddrive (like my Samsung), implying any sata drive should work. (?)

2) Good: DVR has higher resolution 'D1' capability (anything less and you're looking at blurs on the screen). Bad: none of the cameras are capable of full D1 resolution. D1 is already not truly high resolution. The cameras are close, but I'd want cameras with more, not less capability.

3) If you want the ability to see stuff happening in good light but not necessarily identify things like license plates this system might be ok for you. Just don't expect wonderfulness.

Edit:
4) You do need to run the cables from the cameras to your DVR. Not Wireless.

5) You supply the monitor/display screen.

gillamonstar


quality posts: 0 Private Messages gillamonstar
dkahn63 wrote:Hi, all can anybody recommend a wireless camera setup that I can view on the interent to keep track of my elderly mother that lives by her self... thanks all



Watch Newegg.com. They frequently have deals on ip cams. If you search ip cams there, you will most likely receive an email within a day or so telling you their ip cams are "on sale"

I've picked up 2 ip cams for 60% off retail.

To the others here complaining that this is a substandard < fill in the blank > .... This is a low cost low function security cam system. If you want state-of-the-art video surveillance system, #1 you're not going to find it on woot!, #2 you're not going to find it for < $1,000... get over it.

anne183


quality posts: 0 Private Messages anne183

I bought a Zmodo system last week on woot. It was hard to install but tech support finally got me through it. I had to buy additional cable. It works with android, iPod, iPhone, PC but doesn't work on my MacBook - tech support confirmed it won't. Bought a monitor too. All in all, I'm happy with it so far, just know there's a bit of work and extra money to really get it going well.

kmartind


quality posts: 38 Private Messages kmartind
cycokiller wrote:In relation to the hacking issues, UPNP is for amateurs. It should always be disabled and you should manually configure port forwarding as needed so you know what's coming and going on your router. If you're too lazy to manage your network properly, you deserve to be hacked.


Actually no. Not any more so than people who unknowingly use bike locks that can be opened with a Bic pen "deserve" to have their bikes stolen.

These types of systems are low cost consumer/home/small business products. Not everyone is a network engineer, nor can everyone afford to hire one just to set up a cheap camera system on their home network with two PCs so they can keep an eye on their dogs. People plug in a pre-packaged security system that claims to offer authenticated access and that appears to actually be relatively secure, and yet its hidden functionality is wide open, by default, to anyone on the Internet who can do a Google search. That's absolutely unacceptable, and trying to entirely blame the victim is absurd.

That having been said, I do use a real router that doesn't even support UPNP, and have held networking certifications in previous jobs, but if I had one of the Swann camera systems or similar (and this Woot! is pretty similar) I'd still be worried about even opening one single port to it for general access at this point. The company that wrote the firmware for most of these systems has demonstrated such a profound lack of competence and/or judgement that none of their code can be trusted.

cycokiller


quality posts: 6 Private Messages cycokiller
kmartind wrote:Actually no. Not any more so than people who unknowingly use bike locks than can be opened with a Bic pen "deserve" to have their bikes stolen.

These types of systems are low cost consumer/home/small business products. Not everyone is a network engineer, nor can everyone afford to hire one just to set up a cheap camera system on their home network with two PCs so they can keep an eye on their dogs. People plug in a pre-packaged security system that claims to offer authenticated access and that appears to actually be relatively secure, and yet its hidden functionality is wide open, by default, to anyone on the Internet who can do a Google search. That's absolutely unacceptable, and trying to entirely blame the victim is absurd.

That having been said, I do use a real router that doesn't even support UPNP, and have held networking certifications in previous jobs, but if I had one of the Swann camera systems or similar (and this Woot! is pretty similar) I'd still be worried about even opening one single port for general access at this point. The company that wrote the firmware for most of these systems has demonstrated such a profound lack of competence and/or judgement that none of their code can be trusted.



I didn't say anything about people using these systems. What I did say is that UPNP shouldn't be used by anyone and that if you fail to manage your network properly, you leave yourself open for problems.

Both are true statements, whether you are a network engineer or a Wal-mart customer service representative. They have nothing to do with security systems having poorly written firmware, and certainly nothing at all to do with bicycle locks.

Sheesh people, learn to read.

4F682120446F6E277420746F756368206D652074686572652100

rayjj


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rayjj

Folks that have gotten sytems off woot, just in general, how are you running all the wiring to the cameras? Would seem to be a bit of a chore to run it where the wiring is concealed, and the to get it to outside for these outdoor cams.

kmartind


quality posts: 38 Private Messages kmartind
cycokiller wrote:I didn't say anything about people using these systems. What I did say is that UPNP shouldn't be used by anyone and that if you fail to manage your network properly, you leave yourself open for problems.


You said "In relation to the hacking issues," which in this case is specifically in reference to vulnerable camera systems (and by obvious extension, the people using them), and also used the exact words "too lazy" and "deserve to be hacked" not "leave yourself open for problems." Maybe that's not what you meant, but is what you said. It makes a huge difference in the tone of the posting.
In any case, this isn't the place for petty personal attacks like:

cycokiller wrote:Sheesh people, learn to read.


It should be obvious that my intent is simply to warn people, who might not otherwise realize it, that many camera systems similar to these have been found completely open for access by anyone who cares to look. If I were thinking about purchasing such a system I would want to know about that upfront so I could take it into account. If others don't consider such information to be of value, they are free to ignore it.

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 503 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

basscheez wrote:The Features tab says you get 60 ft. cables. The Specs page says you get 25 ft. cables. Which is it?



Whoops, our bad. We've checked with the vendor and here are the correct measurements. The sale is being fixed.

4 Cameras set has 4 x 60ft cables
2 Cameras set has 2 x 60ft cables

cycokiller


quality posts: 6 Private Messages cycokiller
rayjj wrote:Folks that have gotten sytems off woot, just in general, how are you running all the wiring to the cameras? Would seem to be a bit of a chore to run it where the wiring is concealed, and the to get it to outside for these outdoor cams.



I've not purchased one of these off woot!, but the running cables in existing structures thing certainly isn't limited to security systems.

I've ran hundreds of feet of CAT5 cabling through old office buildings as well as old houses and you are right, it can be quite a chore. Even with the right tools (which can also be costly), you will get frustrated. Having an attic and/or an unfinished basement makes things somewhat easier, but you still have to crawl around and fish wires through some tight spots.

There are a couple things that I can mention that have helped me over the years.

There is a tool store, that sounds like "Barber Kate", that has some pretty cheap and long drill bits. You can drill through 2-3 studs at a time, or use them to reach into tight areas. They're super handy.

Also, when you do pull wires, ALWAYS pull an extra piece of string/twine/wire/etc. along with it and tie it off on both ends. This can come in super handy later on if you need to pull something else or replace a wire, stuff like that.

One more thing, if you have an unfinished basement (or any room for that matter), install some 1.5"-2" conduit in the walls before you finish them. Makes it super-easy to pull more wires later when you need them.

4F682120446F6E277420746F756368206D652074686572652100

ajax4hire


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ajax4hire

No.
uPNP traffic goes outside your network only if you allow it thru your router.

So, yes, it is a security risk if configure your router to uPNP your PlayStation3 or xBox or unpatched WindowsXP computer or Video Surveillance System to allow the unsecure uPNP protocol to tunnel into your network.

The security risk is leaving your doors open, your router open to the world.

If I leave my door open and someone steals my 47inch TV I bought on Woot.com, I don't blame the TV for poor security.

kmartind wrote:These are great for letting others spy on your home/business/etc without your permission.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/01/28/more-than-a-dozen-brands-of-security-camera-systems-vulnerable-to-hacker-hijacking/
(actually Zmodo claims their products from 2011 and later shouldn't be as vulnerable to "the same" intrusions as the numerous similar brands, but it still might be wise to keep tabs on the situation as it develops since it doesn't state which year's model these were).

The workaround for vulnerable models, which these might not be, is to turn off uPNP on your router (even though doing so can cause problems with PSN, XBox Live, or Cisco VPN clients, etc) and don't forward any ports to the camera system. That prevents you from accessing your own cameras remotely though.



sdownin


quality posts: 12 Private Messages sdownin

For some reason the main photo makes me think I'm buying the Flying Spaghetti Monster.

kmartind


quality posts: 38 Private Messages kmartind
ajax4hire wrote:No.
uPNP traffic goes outside your network only if you allow it thru your router.


That implies you've taken some action to allow it through. What most users actually do is plug the router in, go through the "secure" quick setup, maybe glance at the manual if they're really thorough, and then expect it to work. In many (probably most) cases, the router comes up, by default, with UPnP (specifically IGD DCP) enabled. That's great for usability since you can just turn on your Xbox and it contacts your router and instructs it to forward the necessary ports automatically so that Live will work.
The obvious downside is that the typical user often has no idea this has happened. As far as they know, they've put in this router or firewall appliance and the box told them it would protect their network, so they assume it actually does.
On the other hand if UPnP is turned off by default in the name of protecting customers from themselves, then they get upset and call support when their console can't do multiplayer, and trying to talk them through port forwarding is likely to be about as much fun as a root canal.
I don't really know what the correct answer is for the average consumer, but I do think it's important to at least let people know about potential problems like this so that they don't incorrectly assume there's nothing to worry about.
What I'd kind of like to see is what I'd call "conditional" or "authenticated" UPnP. Something that would allow the user to either whitelist specific devices on their network that the router should allow UPnP requests from, or some other form of asking for your permission and then still being able to automatically make the needed changes for things to work as expected. That would at least ensure the user knows what's happening.

If I leave my door open and someone steals my 47inch TV I bought on Woot.com, I don't blame the TV for poor security.


The problem is that some products give you the false appearance of security so you don't even realize your door is "open." It might be partly your fault for not doing the extra research to find out it's insecure, but you'd certainly still have a valid reason to be upset.

subether


quality posts: 3 Private Messages subether
cycokiller wrote:I've not purchased one of these off woot!, but the running cables in existing structures thing certainly isn't limited to security systems.

I've ran hundreds of feet of CAT5 cabling through old office buildings as well as old houses and you are right, it can be quite a chore. Even with the right tools (which can also be costly), you will get frustrated. Having an attic and/or an unfinished basement makes things somewhat easier, but you still have to crawl around and fish wires through some tight spots.

There are a couple things that I can mention that have helped me over the years.

There is a tool store, that sounds like "Barber Kate", that has some pretty cheap and long drill bits. You can drill through 2-3 studs at a time, or use them to reach into tight areas. They're super handy.


These are generally known as "bell hanger bits", and have a small hole just behind the screw tip to allow one to tie a pull string to it to pull through the hole they've just drilled.
Another specialized tool is what are referred to as 'fish poles' which are 7 foot long fiberglass poles with screw fittings at both ends- these can be screwed together to allow long distances to be spanned by a single person. some versions even glow in the dark.

cycokiller wrote:Also, when you do pull wires, ALWAYS pull an extra piece of string/twine/wire/etc. along with it and tie it off on both ends. This can come in super handy later on if you need to pull something else or replace a wire, stuff like that.

One more thing, if you have an unfinished basement (or any room for that matter), install some 1.5"-2" conduit in the walls before you finish them. Makes it super-easy to pull more wires later when you need them.


+ MANY- I'm looking at running coax and network cable in the 60's vintage home I've bought, and I'm *not* looking forward to it.

cycokiller


quality posts: 6 Private Messages cycokiller
subether wrote:bellhanger bits ... glow rods



Agreed, those rods are super handy (I have the glowy ones); I didn't mention them cause they're kinda spendy usually. Also, the metal "fish tape" tools can get into some pretty tight spots.

One note on the long drill bits I mentioned, they DO NOT have the holes in the tip of the bits like the ones subether mentioned. Those are available, and can be found in lengths up to 6 or 8 feet if I remember correctly, and are usually somewhat flexible. The less expensive ones I mentioned are 2 or 3 feet long, pretty rigid and have no holes.

4F682120446F6E277420746F756368206D652074686572652100

caryatid


quality posts: 1 Private Messages caryatid

I have a quick question. Do these record audio as well, or just video? We were wanting to purchase a set to use in our dance studio to record choreography. Do you think these would work for that?

slidewayes


quality posts: 0 Private Messages slidewayes
5150kc wrote:*Stupid Question*

Will the DVR - once supplied with a HD - re-write itself after a certain period of time?

Example: It records for two days straight and there is no break-in. Will the HD then re-record over the existing content?



Most DVR's have a large Variety of settings to play with for recording. Some of the more common universal settings are motion sensitive recording, or time block set recording. Most DVR's will generally record over old data after they reach their maximum. Lets say that you are recording in HD quality and that allows 14 days of solid recorded play back. This means that on day 15 you lose day 1's data and so on.

Hope this helped.

extech01


quality posts: 3 Private Messages extech01
kmartind wrote:Actually no. Not any more so than people who unknowingly use bike locks that can be opened with a Bic pen "deserve" to have their bikes stolen.

These types of systems are low cost consumer/home/small business products. Not everyone is a network engineer, nor can everyone afford to hire one just to set up a cheap camera system on their home network with two PCs so they can keep an eye on their dogs. People plug in a pre-packaged security system that claims to offer authenticated access and that appears to actually be relatively secure, and yet its hidden functionality is wide open, by default, to anyone on the Internet who can do a Google search. That's absolutely unacceptable, and trying to entirely blame the victim is absurd.

That having been said, I do use a real router that doesn't even support UPNP, and have held networking certifications in previous jobs, but if I had one of the Swann camera systems or similar (and this Woot! is pretty similar) I'd still be worried about even opening one single port to it for general access at this point. The company that wrote the firmware for most of these systems has demonstrated such a profound lack of competence and/or judgement that none of their code can be trusted.



nice post

carazzie


quality posts: 1 Private Messages carazzie

Got it - installed a DVR rated hard drive, very pleased! The cables are just the right length for my humble abode. Haven't put it on my network yet...but pleased with operation of the DVR and resolution of the cameras. Thanks Woot!

willychee


quality posts: 1 Private Messages willychee
dkahn63 wrote:Hi, all can anybody recommend a wireless camera setup that I can view on the interent to keep track of my elderly mother that lives by her self... thanks all



Foscom makes above average ip cameras which are wireless and can tilt and twist. A few of these in the house is all you need. You can log into them from the web, once you have configured the router.